The text of Daniel Defoe’s 1722 work with added maps and links.
A lockdown project during 2020/2021 — the Years of the Pandemic by Brian Clear — Tower Hill.

1665 — A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe 1722

Front cover from the 1722 edition — Source: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/376/376-h/376-h.htm

A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe 1722

being Observations or Memorials of the most remarkable occurrences, as well public as private, which happened in London during the last great visitation in 1665.
Written by a CITIZEN who continued all the while in London.
Never made publick before
LONDON 1722

Introduction

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Journal_of_the_Plague_Year

A Journal of the Plague Year is a book by Daniel Defoe, first published in March 1722. It is an account of one man’s experiences of the…


Part of a series — A Journal of the Plague Year — An Annotated Text

Physicians / Apothecary

Sir Edward Alston (1595–1669)

was the president of the College of Physicians.

while the college was unguarded during the plague, thieves carried off the money.

William Boghurst — Apothecary

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ditton,_Kent#Notable_people

William Boghurst was an apothecary, and native, of Ditton, who remained in London during the Great Plague of 1665. During the plague, his medical practice expanded and he made his name. He stayed in the city throughout the epidemic, treating by his own account “40, 50 or 60 patients a day”. By the end of the year his reputation was sufficient to attract…


Part of a series — A Journal of the Plague Year — An Annotated Text

Thomas Vincent

During 1665, the year of the Great Plague of London, he constantly preached in parish churches.[2]

And if Monday night was dreadful, Tuesday night was more dreadful, when far the greatest part of the city was consumed: many thousands who on Saturday had houses convenient in the city, both for themselves, and to entertain others, now have not where to lay their head; and the fields are the only receptacle which they can find for themselves and their goods; most of the late inhabitants of…


Part of a series — A Journal of the Plague Year — An Annotated Text

1665 in Science


Part of a series — A Journal of the Plague Year — An Annotated Text

Eyam

Eyam is an English village and civil parish in the Derbyshire Dales. It lies within the Peak District National Park.

As Londoners fled the plague they brought it with them. Eyam had one of the worst outbreaks.

In the later 20th century, the local economy now relies on the tourist trade and it is promoted as “the plague village”, and how it chose to isolate itself after bubonic plague was discovered there, so as to prevent the infection spreading

The history of the plague in…


Part of a series — A Journal of the Plague Year — An Annotated Text

Churches

St Dunstan’s, Stepney

The church is surrounded by a churchyard of nearly seven acres (28,000 m²). In 1658 William Greenhill was appointed vicar whilst retaining his position as a preacher at Stepney Meeting House. He held this post for about seven years, till he was ejected immediately after the Restoration in 1660.

Shortly after this, the churchyard was enlarged to cope with the massive number of deaths during the Great Plague of London. …


Part of a series — A Journal of the Plague Year — An Annotated Text

People

Sir John Cass (February 1661[a] — 5 July 1718) was an English merchant/slave trader , Tory member of parliament and philanthropist.

He was born in Rosemary Lane, in the City of London, son of Thomas Cass, carpenter to the Royal Ordnance. He was baptised on 28 February 1660 at St Botolph’s Aldgate. In 1665, the family moved to Grove Street, in South Hackney to escape the plague.

Cass founded a school for fifty boys and forty girls in buildings in the churchyard of St Botolph’s…


Part of a series — A Journal of the Plague Year — An Annotated Text

1665 in literature


Part of a series — A Journal of the Plague Year — An Annotated Text

King Charles II

Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685)[c] was King of Scotland from 1649 until 1651, and King of Scotland, England and Ireland from the 1660 Restoration of the monarchy until his death in 1685.

Charles II was the eldest surviving child of Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland and Henrietta Maria of France. After Charles I’s execution at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, at the climax of the English Civil War …Charles fled to mainland Europe. A political crisis that followed the death of…

Brian Clear

IT developer in London. Local history buff.

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